retronator:

PixelJoint
Top Pixel Art — September 2014

(Top 10 ranks, titles and authors written in captions. Original posts can be found by following the source linked above.)

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1,386 notes

algopop:

Animating Virtual Characters using Physics-Based Simulation by  Thomas Geijtenbeek

The PhD research of Geijtenbeek is about using Genetic Algorithms and physics simulation to train bipedal characters to walk.

"The total optimization time depends on the character model and the type of experiment; the number of evaluated generations varies between 500 and 3000. On a standard
PC, optimization time takes between 2 and 12 hours.”

Video embedded below:

(Source: sizvideos)

6,676 notes

captoring:

matosuwa:

zerostatereflex:

Not everyone sees the same color when they stare at this spinning disk.
The gif is called, “Benham’s disk" "is named after the English toymaker Charles Benham, who in 1895 sold a top painted with the pattern shown. When the disk is spun, arcs of pale color, called Fechner colors or pattern-induced flicker colors (PIFCs), are visible at different places on the disk. Not everyone sees the same colors."
"The phenomenon originates from neural activity in the retina and spatial interactions in the primary visual cortex, which plays a role in encoding low-level image features, such as edges and spatiotemporal frequency components."
Fascinating how our brains work, I see a brown tan, what do you see? :D

i see lavender!

bright green! ah this is so cooool
we should use this whenever we need to assign a random color to ourselves, for games and stuff

captoring:

matosuwa:

zerostatereflex:

Not everyone sees the same color when they stare at this spinning disk.

The gif is called, “Benham’s disk" "is named after the English toymaker Charles Benham, who in 1895 sold a top painted with the pattern shown. When the disk is spun, arcs of pale color, called Fechner colors or pattern-induced flicker colors (PIFCs), are visible at different places on the disk. Not everyone sees the same colors."

"The phenomenon originates from neural activity in the retina and spatial interactions in the primary visual cortex, which plays a role in encoding low-level image features, such as edges and spatiotemporal frequency components."

Fascinating how our brains work, I see a brown tan, what do you see? :D

i see lavender!

bright green! ah this is so cooool

we should use this whenever we need to assign a random color to ourselves, for games and stuff

48,030 notes

lightprocesses:

Cube system.Coded in Processing.60 frames.Related: Cube

lightprocesses:

Cube system.

Coded in Processing.
60 frames.

Related: Cube

241 notes

staceythinx:

Algorithmic Menagerie by Raven Kwok

Kwok on his project:

Algorithmic Menagerie is a continuation of and the MFA thesis work of my long term research exploring artificial life and self-organization in the field of computer-based generative art. Programmed in Processing, Algorithmic Menagerie is an interactive virtual environment inhabited by algorithmic creatures. These creatures with dynamic cellular structures are created using various methods of finite subdivision on geometric objects, and exhibit different kinds of biological interactions with each other, reaching an equilibrium within the simulated ecosystem. Audience participants are invited to intervene or interact in the life processes.

For the audio part of the project, I collaborated with my colleague K. Michael Fox, who designed unique sonification rule for each species and sonified the entire simulated eco-system in real-time using Super Collider.

See it in motion in this video:

Algorithmic Menagerie from Raven Kwok on Vimeo.

(Source: Vice Magazine)

691 notes

staceythinx:

Algorithmic Menagerie by Raven Kwok

Kwok on his project:

Algorithmic Menagerie is a continuation of and the MFA thesis work of my long term research exploring artificial life and self-organization in the field of computer-based generative art. Programmed in Processing, Algorithmic Menagerie is an interactive virtual environment inhabited by algorithmic creatures. These creatures with dynamic cellular structures are created using various methods of finite subdivision on geometric objects, and exhibit different kinds of biological interactions with each other, reaching an equilibrium within the simulated ecosystem. Audience participants are invited to intervene or interact in the life processes.

For the audio part of the project, I collaborated with my colleague K. Michael Fox, who designed unique sonification rule for each species and sonified the entire simulated eco-system in real-time using Super Collider.

See it in motion in this video:

Algorithmic Menagerie from Raven Kwok on Vimeo.

(Source: Vice Magazine)

691 notes